Tag Archives: philadelphia

On Tour: Blue Bell, PA

1 Dec

October 19, 2017 | Oil & Water | Blue Bell, PA

Oil & Water — Before Hollywood, there was Pennsylvania

Stars were made in Montgomery County. In the early years of movie making, Betzwood Film Studios on the banks of Pennsylvania’s Schuylkill River, was the world’s largest, most advanced film studio.

I learned this surprising history from Brent Woods, senior director of cultural affairs at Montgomery County Community College, in Blue Bell, PA. Woods is deeply engaged in building an audience for the arts, and his enthusiasm for this community and its role in film history is infectious.

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Today the college is home to the world’s largest known archive of Betzwood movie studio artifacts, thanks to resident expert and history professor emeritus Joseph Eckhardt. According to Eckhardt’s website, https://mc3betzwood.wordpress.com, Betzwood was a sprawling 350-acre complex where more than 100 films were produced and circulated worldwide. It was built by Siegmund Lubin, a German-Jewish immigrant, who by 1912 was America’s first movie mogul. Lubin is credited with being the first to mass market films, and he employed up to 1,000 people who churned out five to six million feet of film at the studio each week. Among the footage Betzwood created was this train wreck, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p-SV46oJR8o&feature=youtu.be, which Lubin used in five of his films. Click on it, it’s really a train wreck.

As I toured the campus on my final stop on the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation tour, it was easy to imagine stars emerging from this community today. I observed students composing music, recording a radio show, and pitching projects in a classroom that looked more like an executive suite. I saw several dozen camera bags loaded with gear for students to make films, as well as a television studio and state-of-the-art editing suites. Students at Montgomery County Community College are learning in an exceptional environment. I’m excited for them, and perhaps even a little envious.

I’d like to thank Jerry Collom for inviting me to meet with students in his advanced video production class, as well as Matt Porter for the department tour, and Iain Campbell for the care he took in ensuring a perfect screening. Thanks especially to Brent Woods for taking the time to give me a window into the community’s future, as well as fascinating past. I couldn’t have asked for a lovelier way to end the tour.

Post provided by On Screen/In Person touring filmmaker Francine Strickwerda

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On Tour: Lancaster, PA

21 Nov

October 12, 2017 | Oil & Water | Lancaster, PA

Oil & Water — Just Say “Yes”

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I was a little overwhelmed by the email asking if I would add extra time to my visit to Lancaster, PA, as part of screening “Oil & Water.” Would I be interested in speaking with classes on both ends of the screening? Could I arrive a day early, and leave a day later?

The mail was from Barry Kornhauser, and as it turns out, the only good response to an opportunity from Barry, is “YES.”

Barry is one of those rare, radiant, bright light people. He uses his power for good; connecting artists with audiences to thoughtfully explore the critical issues of our time, as the assistant director of Campus & Community Engagement at Millersville University. Barry is also a prolific playwright who recently received the governor of Pennsylvania’s Artist of the Year Award.

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A whirlwind of a man, Barry walks fast, knows everybody, and stops frequently to listen with genuine concern and delight. I am so grateful for the care Barry takes in planning unusual engagement, including two different nature activities for “Oil & Water,” a canoe excursion and nature hike with local naturalists, in partnership with the Lancaster Department of Parks and Recreation. Free “Oil & Water” movie tickets for the participants!

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The turnout for the film screening at the Ware Center theater was huge and enthusiastic. We were fortunate to have the documentary’s star David Poritz, founder of Equitable Origin (www.equitableorigin.org) join us thorough Skype to chat with the audience, as well as an impressive panel of experts. It’s not every day that filmmakers get to hear experts like these take the stage to analyze their films, and it was a pleasure. Many thanks to:

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  • Andrea Campbell, Board Member, Lancaster County Conservancy
  • Nadine Garner, Director of the Center for Sustainability and Associate Professor of Psychology, Millersville University
  • Eric Hirsch, Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, Franklin & Marshall College
  • Mary Ann Schlegel, Naturalist, Lancaster County Parks
  • Chris Steuer, Sustainability Manager, Millersville University
  • Amory Lovins, physicist and chairman/chief scientist of the Rocky Mountain Institute

Named one of Time Magazine’s “100 Most Influential People,” Amory Lovins was a last-minute addition to the panel, since his reason for visiting Lancaster was to give Franklin & Marshall College’s Mueller Fellow lecture, “Astonishing Energy Futures and the Future of Global Change.”  Check out his TED Talk and prepare to be astonished: https://www.ted.com/talks/amory_lovins_a_50_year_plan_for_energy#t-50668

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Lastly, I want to thank Millersville University’s Changfu Chang and Jean Boal for having me visit with their documentary film and biology classes, as well Franklin & Marshall College’s Dirk Eitzen with his film class. Sometimes it’s easy to get caught up in the minutiae of life. Barry, his community, and this film tour reminded me of the gift of saying “YES.”

Post provided by On Screen/In Person touring filmmaker Francine Strickwerda

On Tour: Philadelphia, PA

24 Oct

October 10, 2017 | Oil & Water | Philadelphia, PA

Oil & Water — On the Road Again

As I arrived at the Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia last week for the first screening on our new Mid Atlantic Arts tour, I checked the newsfeed on my phone to discover the latest threat to the planet. The Environmental Protection Agency had just announced plans to withdraw the Clean Power Plan, the Obama-era rule regulating greenhouse gas emissions.

It’s been three years since we released Oil & Water to the world. The film, about two boys coming of age as they fight for environmental justice in the Amazon, has never been more relevant, and not for reasons we could have expected. Environmental protections in our own country are increasingly under attack. Who could have predicted that the EPA would be run by Scott Pruitt, a man who had previously sued the EPA 14 times, or that we would have a president who campaigned on the promise of dismantling the very institution itself?

Oil & Water came about in part because there was no EPA in Ecuador, and the oil industry behaved in whatever ways they could get away with. Hugo Lucitante, one of the film’s main characters, and his tribe, the Cofan people, are still dealing with the crushing effects of oil pollution, and trying to protect the land they have left against the threats of oil companies and other outsiders. They’ve been pushed to the edge of their territory, and every day that passes brings them closer to future with a diminishing likelihood of survival.

After the screening, audience members wanted to know, “How can we help?” For those moved to help in Ecuador, there are a variety of non-profits that are working on the ground, including the organizations featured in the film, The Cofan Survival Fund (www.cofan.org) and Equitable Origin (www.equitableorigin.org). But one also need look no further than one’s own backyard, because these problems are everywhere.

In Pennsylvania where I’m touring the film, controversy swirls around fracking and new natural gas infrastructure projects like the Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline, that when completed, will carry natural gas through 10 counties. Despite opposition from farmers and other land owners, industry is seizing private land through eminent domain. Many are protesting out of fear for the safety of their drinking water.

As a filmmaker, I’m feeling especially grateful to the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation and all our screening hosts for the opportunity to get out and talk about the work of Oil & Water’s extraordinary young stars, Hugo Lucitante and David Poritz. And especially for the opportunity to listen to the stories of the people I’m meeting in audiences and university classroom visits along the way. Energy issues and the care of our environment affect us all. As I like to say, we’re all in this together. Let’s figure it out.

Post provided by On Screen/In Person touring filmmaker Francine Strickwerda

On Tour: Wilmington, DE

18 Oct

September 27 2017 | DEEJ | Wilmington, DE

I had time for a stroll down historic Market Street, and take in a combination of landmarks such as The Queen, the Old Town Hall and 18th century houses, sprinkled among 21st century businesses, coffee houses and restaurants.

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Wilmington, Delaware: the final stop on the Onscreen/In Person tour!  I have to confess that as a resident of Maryland, I’ve passed through Wilmington many times by train or by car, on my way to New York or other points north.  Screening Deej at The Queen, vintage early 1800’s, was a long-overdue way to connect with downtown Wilmington, past and present.

I arrived early, so I had time for a stroll down historic Market Street, and take in a combination of landmarks such as The Queen, the Old Town Hall and 18th century houses, sprinkled among 21st century businesses, coffee houses and restaurants.  It’s a city center working to reshape itself, fusing old and new, and the Light Up the Queen Foundation is a vital part of that effort.

Thanks to the Foundation’s Tina Betz and Judy Hickman, the Deej screening and discussion similarly drew on local community resources – in the form of advocates in the fields of autism and disability:

  • Annalisa Ekbladh, a parent advocate and leader of Autism Delaware’s family support division, which provides more than 200 social recreational and support events each year;
  • Katina Demetriou, director of Autism Delaware’s POW&R (Productive Opportunities for Work & Recreation), a community-based vocational program working with 85 partner businesses;
  • Brian Freedman, associate director of the University of Delaware’s Center for Disabilities Studies, helping people with disabilities increase their independence and lead productive lives;
  • Cari A. Phillips, special education coordinator for K-5 level children in Delaware’s Red Clay Consolidated School District and PhD candidate at the University of Delaware.
  • Brent Sullivan, 48-year-old nonspeaking Autistic and advocate for neurological difference; ably assisted by Dylan Belnavis-Flexner.

Using a letter board, Brent described what it was like to have no access to communication during his younger years, when his abilities were consistently underestimated – and how his life is markedly different today.

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I am especially grateful to all the screening hosts who gave nonspeaking Autistics a voice in the discussions connected to the screenings.

  • The Wayne Theatre, Waynesboro, VA – Charlie Taylor
  • The Annenberg Center, Philadelphia, PA – Nick Pentzell
  • Montgomery Community College, Blue Bell, PA – Brian Foti
  • The BlackRock Center for the Arts, Germantown, MD – Gordy Baylinson and Jack Alnutt
  • The Atlas Performing Arts Center, Washington, DC – Benjamin McGann
  • Wilmington, DE – Brent Sullivan

I hasten to add that the few who didn’t, simply couldn’t, because of a lack of viable candidates – an indication of how far we as a society still need to go to grant access to communication to everyone.

I’m grateful for all the work the screening hosts invested in choosing the films for the tour in the first place, and then working to attract an audience and assemble dynamic discussion panels.  I want to thank you all, including Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation, for a memorable, deeply fulfilling experience!

Post provided by On Screen/In Person filmmaker Robert Rooy

On Tour: Washington, DC

18 Oct

September 26, 2017 | DEEJ | Washington, DC

Heading into the final week of the Deej Onscreen/In Person tour, I’m amazed at how time has flown by, and what an inspiring trip it’s been.  Documentary filmmaking is often a solitary pursuit.  Sharing one’s film with an audience, then talking about it with panelists and attendees who often have a tremendous amount at stake in the issues Deej embraces, is a heady experience.

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This was especially true of our screening at the Atlas Performing Arts Center in Washington, DC.  For one thing, it was co-sponsored by Docs In Progress, a nonprofit based in Silver Spring, Maryland that creates and fosters a supportive community for documentary filmmakers.  In many ways, it was my “go to” support system during the making of Deej – so to have them involved in this screening was a way to thank them and the greater DC film community for all the support that came my way during a lengthy and sometimes arduous process.  Erica Ginsburg, executive director, served as moderator to the post-screening discussion, keeping it moving and on track.

In addition, in this DC event, we were fortunate to be in the backyard of some leading activists for autistic rights, which allowed them to take part in the discussion.  As in several of our previous events, we were fortunate to have on the panel members of the autistic community, including Benjamin McGann, a nonspeaking self-advocate.  Assisted by Elizabeth Vosseller, he shared, “It is refreshing to hear this kind of discussion.  I am an adult; however, many view me as a child because I cannot speak.  But I can think and learn and love and work.”

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[l-r] Erica Ginsberg, Robert Rooy, Julia Bascom, Jenn Lynn, Elizabeth Vosseller, Benjamin McGann

Julia Bascom introduced herself not only as the executive director of the Autistic Self Advocacy Network but also as someone who identifies as an Autistic.  She underscored that this is true of all of ASAN’s staff members – that the nonprofit advocacy organization lives and breathes its motto: “Nothing about us without us.”  She was grateful that Deej is more successful than most films in its depiction of autism by allowing DJ to fully participate in the telling of his story.

Completing the panel were other autism and disability professionals.  Besides serving as Benjamin’s communication aide, Elizabeth Vosseller spoke as the director of the Growing Kids Therapy Center, a DC-based organization that specializes in supporting the communication challenges of children in the autism spectrum, including those who don’t speak.

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[l-r] Erica Ginsberg, Robert Rooy, Julia Bascom, Jenn Lynn, Elizabeth Vosseller, Benjamin McGann

And, Jenn Lynn contributed as author, speaker, and executive director of Upcounty Community Resources, a nonprofit that serves fitness, social and therapeutic needs of adults with special needs.  She also publishes, along with her 14-year-old son Jake, a blog: TheWorldAccoringtoJake.com.

My thanks goes to Doug Yeuell, executive director of the Atlas, and the rest of his staff for their hospitality, and for bringing not just Deej, but an impressive array overall of performing arts to the H Street neighborhood in DC!

 

Post provided by On Screen/In Person filmmaker Robert Rooy

On Tour: Germantown, MD

27 Sep

September 22, 2017 | DEEJ | Germantown, MD

The screening of Deej at the BlackRock Center for the Arts in Germantown, MD, was special in a couple of ways.  For one thing, it was only twenty miles or so from my hometown of Frederick, so lots of friends came to see it!  And, in a pretty short timeframe, we were able to put together a strong group of autistic self-advocates who joined the conversation onstage after the screening.

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Two Maryland teenagers contributed in a big way to the conversation, each nonspeaking and typing with no physical support.  Gordy Baylinson of Potomac, Maryland is well-known locally for a letter he wrote to a police officer, explaining why she and colleagues need to understand that while Gordy’s brain “knows what it wants and how to make that clear,” his body “is much like a drunken, almost six foot toddler…” With the help of Meghann Parkinson, who held his letter board, he shared his thoughts on what a difference learning to communicate has made.

More regarding Gordy’s letter and life can be found here.

Jack Alnutt, a student at nearby Quince Orchard High School, shared that “it took years of perseverance” to learn to communicate.  His mom, Amy, added that he only succeeded four years ago, and the first thing he typed was “I am trying and I’m really smart.”

Both Jack’s and Gordy’s parents shared the challenges they’ve had in convincing local school systems that their sons deserve to be included in mainstream high school classes, and remarked that they all know children in the area and beyond who have not been as successful in finding educational opportunities for their children.

Sharon da VanPort, founder and executive director of Autism Women’s Network, weighed in as well, describing how using the wrong language in describing autism can be damaging.  Nonspeaking Autistics, for example, are often described as “nonverbal” – which means, “without words” – which is certainly not the case with Gordy and Jack.  She also called attention to the “high functioning” and “low functioning” labels that help perpetuate the assumption that those who cannot speak or who happen to have pronounced issues with body control somehow can’t measure up.

Thanks to JoAnn Pham and Brian Laird at BlackRock for this opportunity to share Deej in an intimate, state-of-the-art space with a very invested audience!

Post provided by On Screen/In Person filmmaker Robert Rooy

On Tour: Reading, PA

27 Sep

September 20, 2017 | DEEJ | Reading, PA

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Reading Area Community College (RACC) provides a vital path to the future for almost 5,000 students.  Once a thriving metropolis and transportation hub for the coal industry, (remember “Reading Railroad” on the Monopoly board, anyone?), the city of Reading is working to redefine itself economically in the 21st century – taking advantage of its central location halfway between Philadelphia and Harrisburg – and RACC is a vital part of that.

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Kym Kleinsmith, Robert Rooy, Kathi Bashore

One of the highlights of the On screen/In Person tour is the chance to meet and exchange ideas with students.  I can’t thank Natalie Babb, the Miller Center for the Arts’ Outreach Coordinator, enough for digging deep into my past, way earlier than the creation of Deej.  I found myself in Associate Professor Danelle Bower’s Honors Sociology class, chatting with bright, inquisitive students about international poverty issues and strategies to address them.  I would see a considerable number of them later that evening at the screening of Deej.

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Robert Rooy, RACC student Ali Young, Associate Professor, Danelle Bowers

Natalie, along with Cathleen Stephen, Director of the Miller Center, and Brett Buckwalter, Production Manager, organized a social hour before the screening in which a number of local and regional autism advocates could meet each other and audience goers.  Attendees included:

  • Kym Kleinsmith (RACC Director of Disability Services and Student Behavioral Intervention)
  • Kathi Bashore (M.A. Psychology and Author of Can You Just Love Her? A Mother’s Journey with Autism)
  • Suzie Carpenter (author of On the Bright Side: A Mother’s Story of Love and Healing through Her Daughter’s Autism)
  • Sharon Jones (Director of Include Me, an initiative of The Arc of Pennsylvania)
  • Luci Shaeffer (co-founder of the Unending Promise Fund of the Berks County Community Foundation, geared to improve the quality of life for adults living with autism)
  • Mathew Malfaro, (artist and Autistic, who offered a number of sculptures for sale to patrons) and his mother, Claire.

Kym and Kathi joined me onstage following the screening for a stimulating, informative discussion with an audience whose members seemed unusually invested in the issues that Deej raises.  Thanks, Natalie, Cathleen and Brett!

 

Post provided by On Screen/In Person filmmaker Robert Rooy

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